Which industries topped the salary growth table for 2017?

 

The hospitality sector saw the highest rate of growth in salaries in 2017, closely followed by the automotive industry, according to data published by CV-Library which highlighted the industries that saw the biggest increases in advertised salaries last year.

The top industries for advertised salary growth in 2017 were:

1. Hospitality – pay up 10.4%
2. Automotive – pay up 10.2%
3. Agriculture – pay up 9.5%
4. Property – pay up 8.5%
5. Retail – pay up 8.1%
6. Media – pay up 7.5%
7. Design – pay up 7.5%
8. Construction – pay up 6.9%
9. Charity – pay up 6.6%
10. IT – pay up 5.1%

Lee Biggins, founder and managing director of CV-Library, said: “These industries are central to the UK economy’s success and it’s clear that more competition for talent has driven many employers to push up their pay packets in 2017. Interestingly, some of these industries are ones that could be struggling because of a lack of EU workers – agriculture and hospitality for example are heavily reliant on this labour, which could explain why higher pay is being offered.”

The data also highlighted the sectors which saw significant rises in job creation during the same period.

This list was headed by the manufacturing sector, witnessing 22.9% growth in advertised vacancies last year.

The top ten sectors were:

1. Manufacturing – jobs up 22.9%
2. Property – jobs up 18%
3. Automotive – jobs up 17.3%
4. Social Care – jobs up 17%
5. Agriculture – jobs up 13.9%
6. Engineering – jobs up 10.8%
7. Construction – jobs up 10%
8. Recruitment – jobs up 9.6%
9. Design – jobs up 9.2%
10. Finance – jobs up 7.6%

Biggins continues: “January is always a great time to look for a new job. Many businesses across the UK will have unlocked their budgets for 2018, making them ready to strengthen their workforce. If you’re currently looking to earn more, or find work in a sector which is booming, this data could be all you need to help make that all-important career change.”


Wednesday, 10 January 2018

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