What Gen Z’s want from a recruitment process and their careers

 

Many banking and financial institutions have long-thought that there’s a never-ending line of graduates who are queuing up to join them. And whilst it’s probably true to say that this pipeline will never run out per se, it’s also true to note that the people in question are becoming more discerning. As highlighted in Dartmouth Partners most recent survey.

With more choice than ever before (from buy-side, to start up and bulge bracket to boutique), these graduates embarking on a career have quite specific opinions as to what they expect from a recruitment process. And with over 600 graduates taking the time to have their voices heard, Dartmouth Partners are keen to share what they’ve learned.

In short, they expect to be treated professionally. A company’s brand and reputation will only keep them engaged for so long. It’s all about their experience throughout. 44% expect an update on the application within one to two weeks. 45% think the process should be complete within one to two months – so recruitment needs to be quick, streamlined and transparent, with constructive feedback. And if it’s not, they’ll simply move on to a company that can keep them better engaged.

In terms of where they want to work, with the survey centring around financial careers it’ll come as no surprise that London still tops the survey with 84% citing it as their location of choice. Salary expectations remain high, with 43% expecting a starting salary of £45,000+. However what was interesting was that career progression ranked higher than salary for graduates. It means that companies are being advised to view graduates not as a quick fix, but as future leaders.

Terri Loska, Director of Graduate Recruitment at Dartmouth Partners said, “For the first time in a long time we’re seeing graduates looking for the right company for the longer term - the bad news is, they won’t stop interviewing until they find it.

“Barely a day goes by without a news article portraying Gen Z as opportunistic, fair-weather employees who are just biding their time until a better offer comes along. That may be true for some, but consider that of our survey participants, 40% that are graduating in 2017 and 51% that are graduating by 2019, see themselves staying in their first job for 3 to 5 years.”

Thursday, 12 April 2018

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