18 major organisations sign up to the ‘Tech She Can Charter’

 

We’ve seen over the last the few months the backing that the ‘Tech Talent Charter’ is gaining. And it seems the movement to increase the number of females in technology is accelerating apace.

The latest to take action are 18 major organisations who have founded the ‘Tech She Can Charter’ and include include PwC, British Science Association, Business 3.0, Digital Jam, everywoman, FDisruptors, Girlguiding, InnovateHer, JP Morgan, Modern Muse, NatWest Markets, money.co.uk, Sophos, Smoothwall, TechGirls, Tech Talent Charter, Tesco, T Systems and Zoopla Property Group.

Lest we get confused, what’s the difference between the two? Essentially, the ‘Tech Talent Charter’ encourages employers to take more positive steps to attract, recruit and retain more women into technology roles in their workforce. Whereas the ‘Tech She Can Charter’ seems to extend to before that, to focus on tapping into schools to educate and inspire young females to see technology as a career path of choice.

In PwC’s research Women in Tech: Time to Close the Gender Gap, it revealed that 27% of females would consider a career in technology, compared to 62% of males and only 3% of females say it is their first choice of career. It certainly presents a compelling case to suggest that more action needs to be taken.

Their research goes on to show that some of the key reasons females aren’t considering technology roles include: because no one is putting it forward as an option to them, they aren’t given enough information at school about what working in technology involves, and a lack of female role models.

Sheridan Ash, Women in Tech leader at PwC and The Tech She Can Charter founder, said “Waiting until women are entering work is simply too late - to boost the number of females in technology we need to take coordinated action to start inspiring girls to consider technology careers while they are still at school.

“By working together, we can reach more females at an earlier stage of their lives. We need to work harder to raise awareness about the exciting range of technology roles out there, in a sector that has the power to change the world. Promoting visible and relatable role models is a huge part of this, as it’s hard for girls to aspire to be something they can’t see. There are many brilliant women working in technology roles right across the UK, from creatives and designers, to coders and data scientists. Technology is open to all and we need to get that message across.

“We welcome other organisations to sign up to our Charter and take action to solve this important problem.”

As a result, The Tech She Can Charter founding-signatories are committed to:

  • Collectively working with schools across the UK to educate and inspire pupils to consider a career in technology by developing technology toolkits
  • Maximising their impact by targeting schools in the Government’s social mobility ‘coldspots’
  • Celebrating and promoting their successful women in tech role models
  • Ensuring inclusive access to technology roles in their organisations
  • Supporting the right environment to attract, recruit and retain females

Kevin Ellis, chairman and senior partner at PwC, said “The gender imbalance in technology roles is a key issue of our time that we need to work together to address head on. We’re already seeing the huge impact technology is having on our lives. If the sector and people in technology roles don’t reflect wider society there’s a real risk that the products and technology advances will be biased.

“The demand for technology skills from businesses is already reaching critical levels and is only set to increase. This is our chance to build a diverse and inclusive pipeline of technology talent, which will help position UK businesses at the forefront of innovation and investment in the future.”

 

Thursday, 8 March 2018

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